Criminology In Europe

Newsletter of the European Society of Criminology

2014/2

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  • Message from the President

Is There, Should There Be, A European Criminology?

The question in the title could be interpreted in a number of ways. It could mean, is there and should there be a recognisably European scholarly community of people interested in crime and the justice system? The answers are obvious.

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  • Miroslav Scheinost

Czech Criminology: History And Current State

Although the institutional foundations of Czech criminology were laid only the 1960s, the roots of the discipline go much further into the past, namely to the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. Like in other European countries, early Czech criminological thought grew out of two sources: legal science and early theoretical and empirical sociology. While this was not exceptional vis-à-vis other countries, it largely determined future debates, some of which continue to this day, about whether criminology’s position in the system of scientific disciplines is closer to penal law or sociology.

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  • Jiri Burianek

Towards The 14th Esc Annual Conference "Criminology of Europe  –  Inspiration By Diversity" In Prague

The main purpose of most conferences is to offer a chance to meet colleagues, share knowledge and to do some „networking“, as it is usually said. Consequently, the location is probably more important than the theme. After a successful conference in Budapest, however, with more than 1,000 participants, we all feel the obligation to provide for all the needs and expectations of visitors not only in respect of Prague sights or the famous Czech beer, but also concerning intellectual excitement and stimulation. That is why we would like to start this invitation — a bit conventionally — with the idea, with the logos…

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  • Marcelo F. Aebi, Grace Kronicz
  • Report Of The Executive Secretary

ESC Executive Secretariat Annual Report

During the first 12 conferences of the European Society of Criminology (ESC), a clear trend could be observed: the number of participants increased whenever the conferences were held in Mediterranean countries. Hence, Bologna 2007 and Bilbao 2012 held the records for attendance, with 806 and 792 participants, respectively. Then, along came Budapest.

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  • Susanne Karstedt, Nandor Knust
  • Working Group Report

The European Criminology Group On Atrocity Crimes And Transitional Justice (ECACTJ)

Europe, as a region, has witnessed unspeakable mass atrocity crimes and genocide, and Europeans have been involved as perpetrators in mass violence across the globe. However, Europe was also the site of the Nuremberg Trials, where for the first time perpetrators of such crimes were brought to justice. Europe has played a decisive role in the proliferation of legal instruments and procedures ever since then, including International Criminal Tribunals and the International Criminal Court. The world also owes the term ‘genocide’ to Raphael Lemkin, a Polish immigrant in the US.

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  • Judith van Erp
  • Working Group Report

European Working Group on Organisational Crime (EUROC)

The European Working Group on Organisational Crime (EUROC) of the ESC aims to stimulate research in the field of white-collar crime and organisational crime in Europe, and to promote exchange and collaboration between the various European researchers and research groups working in this field.

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  • Marieke Liem
  • Working Group Report

European Homicide Working Group

This has been an exciting year for the European Homicide Working Group on many fronts.

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  • Heinz Leitgöb, Daniel Seddig
  • Working Group Report

Realignment of the European Working Group on Quantitative Methods in Criminology (EQMC)

As of March 2014, the European Quantitative Criminology (EQC) Working Group has been reorganised as the European Working Group on Quantitative Methods in Criminology (EQMC).

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  • Anja Dirkzwager
  • Working Group Report

ESC Working Group Prison Life & Effects of Imprisonment

The ESC Prison Life and Effects of Imprisonment Working Group was established in 2010. Starting with just 15 members, the Working Group has been growing through the years. Currently, 65 members from 20 different countries have joined.

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  • Barry Goldson
  • Working Group Report

Thematic Working Group On Juvenile Justice (TWGJJ)

Further to a very well-attended meeting at the European Society of Criminology Conference in Budapest in September, 2013, the Thematic Working Group on Juvenile Justice (TWGJJ) was re-launched and it is currently chaired/co-ordinated by Professor Barry Goldson, Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology, University of Liverpool, UK and Professor Jenneke Christiaens, Law School, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium (VUB, Free University of Brussels).

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  • Loraine Gelsthorpe
  • Working Group Report

Gender, Crime and Justice Working Group

The idea for the Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice Working Group, as a forum for sharing and debating ideas on gender, crime and criminal justice, emerged at the ESC conference in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in September 2009. Approval was sought from the ESC Executive, and the Working Group was launched at the 2010 conference in Liege.

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  • Cyrus Tata
  • Working Group Report

Sentencing and Penal Decision-Making: The ESC Working Group

In late 2010 the new Sentencing & Penal Decision-Making Working Group was launched. Its aim is to develop academic and policy-oriented thinking, as well as to encourage new European collaborations. In just four years, the Working Group has expanded to over 70 members coming from 25 different European countries.

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Candidates for ESC Offices

Candidates for ESC Presidency and Executive Board membership.

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  • Csaba Győry
  • Editor's Remarks

Cover Stories

Interestingly one of the things that really grip the attention of readers of the Newsletter are the cover pictures. I receive a lot of feedback: some are liked, some are not, some are not really understood.

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